Mountain Climber Form Guide

The Mountain Climber exercise is an excellent bodyweight drill that combines the benefits of the Plank with the rapid, lower body movement of High Knees. Rather than simply holding a stationary position with the Plank, the Mountain Climber exercise.


Neutral Spine
Seek to maintain a neutral spine and a straight body position throughout the exercise. Imagine creating a straight line with your body starting at the top of your head and ending at your heel. This will encourage further core strength engagement throughout the drill.

Activate Abdominals
Rather than simply “going through the motions” as your alternate the movement of your legs, think about flexing and engaging your abdominals with each movement. While Mountain Climbers are an excellent endurance exercise, they can also be a killer core drill as well.

Align Wrist, Elbow, & Shoulder
Similar to the top of the Push-Up position, try to align your shoulders on top of your elbows on top of your wrists. This will ensure a stable platform as your alternate your legs.

Bring Knee Between Elbows
Don’t simply lift your feet off the ground! Instead, crunch your core as you try to get each knee in between your elbows. This full range of motion will require more energy per repetition, making the exercise more challenging.

Keep Your Chin Up
As with the Push-Up, many people have a tendency to drop their chin towards the ground during Mountain Climbers. To avoid this, simply pick a point 2-3 feet in front of you to stare at. This will help you maintain a neutral spine (this isn’t a neck exercise).

Plant-Back Foot
Make sure you have a securely planted back foot with each repetition. This will ensure that you have a stable platform as you rapidly switch feet back and forth.

Resist Body Rocking
As you move your legs rapidly, your core will have a tendency to sway or bounce. Try to counter and resist this motion by engaging your obliques.

Concentrate on your form rather than counting reps by using your Atlas Wristband during the exercise. Mountain Climbers are one of the many drills that the device can track.
Yours in Health,
Peter Li